About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
summary probation which meant go home and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question co
said use all 10 fingers, i'll buy you breakfast. checkpoint, security, two. i survived the situation, got on the plane. the point is this, that what's in my head i've never had to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making
drugs. there's a lot of other vehicles we use to deal with juveniles before it ever gets to a prosecution for possession of drugs. and i think that there's some good reasons for that. i think that when we're talking about juveniles, we should explore every possibility that we can to decriminalize juvenile behavior in order to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use,
and are going to have treatment. i also agree with tal, not necessarily everybody that uses drugs is an addict, and not necessarily everybody who uses drugs needs to have treatment. but having said that, people that we often come in contact with will be people who have a severe drug abuse problem and generally they also have a mental health issue problem, there are often housing problems, employment, many other problems, and that's the population we deal with often. and i think that figuring a way to have an intervention so that services are available for those that need it i think is really important. i don't necessarily agree a felony conviction is the vehicle to do so, but i think we have to make sure that as we lower the sanctions here, that we do have the tools and that we have the ability to distinguish between people that have a drug addiction problem, people that are using drugs recreationally and otherwise are a functional person. >> we're going to be taking audience questions shortly, so if you have a question, just try to get the attention of someone in the aisles. ethan, let me ask
. as psychologists, we study abnormal behavior. anita shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his tal
audrey asked the economic question of me almost immediately after taking office. it benefits us the truth about $55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that i
for bringing us together today and also it is a real pleasure to be here with miss dillan who is a great respectful of her party and an activist in the community. as i think that most californians know that we have spent a lot of time dealing with the issue of pension reform for the public sector workers and i think that we have reached a point where we can going forward deal with pensions in a much more sustain able fashion so that we won't see cities in particular having upwards of 25, 30 percent of the general fund having to go to pension obligations. of course, those promises already made must legally be adhered to. i have also said in a lot of time in this past year, looking at private sector employees in publicly traded corporations, who have seen their benefits wiped out and in many cases actually stolen by top executives who are shifting significant amounts of money to their benefit at the expense of those workers. >> thank you, the time limits are tough, aren't they? >> the next question for mr. leno is state proposition 35, asks if the definition of human trafficking should be
, for letting me come and be part of your class room today. of course your principal for letting us come to be part of your earthquake preparedness day. how many people know what today is? go ahead? what is that? okay. well, yes. [ indiscernible ] >> that is right. we call it the great earthquake drill. yes. we are getting ready. did you know -- let me give you numbers. 56,000 students in our school district are all participating at the same time. in the cities, 322,000 people are part of this drill, yes. then in the state of california 9.3, from los angeles, san diego, san francisco, all participating in this earthquake drill. that is pretty big large numbers of people that are joining all of you. don't you feel special? yeah, everybody is doing this. i have to my left and right are really important department heads. our chief of police is to my left. he is participating and has a lot of staff to support this effort. we have our fire chief. did you know? you reading from the book, grace for president, she is our female chief of our fire department. to her right is rob, the head departme
used is not in educational out comes it is in per pupil. we rank 47th. >> as a result we rank 50 as the number of counselors and the number of nurses in our schools and the number of libranias in. you get what you pay for. >> our state has been starved for cash for the past ten years as a result of tax cuts the state could not afford that the prior governor put on the credit cards. we need to provide significantly more funding not only through k-12 education which is the birth right of every child to be able to get a quality public education in my opinion and to be able to pursue the dream of a higher education and that is getting further and further out of the reach of children in california because the state does not support education. we need funding, we need to spend it on education. >> so, therefore, do you think that community colleges should perhaps change their focus? one idea is to focus on retraining unemployed workers and upgrading skills for new jobs. do you feel that the state should encourage this? and how? >> if you are making reference to the challenges facing the
deported from this country, that is a public safety issue that all of us who live in san francisco have to deal with every day. so i really question whether one can square one of those statements with the other. i believe in the natural law from john stewart mill and other philosophers that our rights do not flow from the government, the government's rights and the government's rights flow from the citizens. and so the government should have as limited a scope as possible, not and interfere with business and not interfere with our privacy and not spy on us and generally keep the public order and that is about it. >> thank you, so following up on that one of those things that the government is involved in right now is the educational system. and california used to have an education system that was the envy of the nation. how do you feel we get that back? >> well, it is a tragedy that what used to be one of the top systems in the country is now i think, 47th according to a recent standard that i saw. the senator and folks in his party in sacramento believe that spending more is the answer
sponsored by our attorney general harris this past year, which expands asset forfet tour, it is a way for us to quickly gain resources so that we can provide services for victims and invest in greater public safety police officers and investigator to deal with these crimes. i am opposed to prop 35, number one because the author of it is the single individual, deep pocket putting this forward. it is not a citizen's initiative. never came to talk to me what was wrong or short with our bill that he had to go to the ballot and expanding the definition to those who have to register as sex offenders to include those who have not even committed a sex crime, i think delutes the benefit of our sex registry. >> i think that the support for 35 is a no-brainer. i support 35. i do agree that the problem with sex trafficking in our society in california is a very significant one. in san francisco is frankly the epi center of sex trafficking industry. and i find it interesting that the attorney general participated with the senator in his abnormal legislation and she did not do much about sex trafficking w
-- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case. generally, very deferential -- i
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)